The Beginning of the End: Possibilities of the Posthuman in Frankenstein

By: Erica Quinones ’22 English and German Studies majors, Political Science and European Studies minors Abstract: This essay will explore Frankenstein as the stillbirth of a posthuman society, revealing insights into the social norms that Mary Shelley uses to define “human” and the structures therein. These insights arise by reading the Creature in Tandem with…

Voices of the Past

By Alaina Perdon ’22 Environmental Studies major, Anthropology and Chesapeake Regional Studies minors Brief Description: Both within and outside of the linguistic community, many consider modern humans to be the only beings in the evolutionary line capable of speech. This essay examines the biological and cultural evidence suggesting Neanderthals were capable of complex vocal communication…

Illegal Pangolin Trade in Sub-Saharan Africa and Its Reflection on the International Political Economy

What a “Scaly Anteater” Can Teach Us About International Relations and Informal Economic Sectors By Julianna Sterling ’23 International Studies, French and Economics majors Brief Description: An analysis on illegal trading and poaching of the African pangolin in the face of increasing Asian enterprise presence in Sub-Saharan Africa, and how these interactions can overshadow localized…

Magnifying Meaning: Making Sense of Annie Dillard’s Methods

By Analiese Bush ’22 Environmental Studies Brief Description: A review of writer Annie Dillard’s techniques and methods in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. The following was written for American Environmental Writing (ENG 347). Magnifying Meaning: Making Sense of Annie Dillard’s Methods Have you ever gone herping? Herping is the act of going out and finding slippery…

British Abolition Movements and Romanticism

By: Liz Hay ’22 Economics and Humanities majors, Public Health minor Brief Description: This paper focuses on the connections between British Romanticism and abolition, particularly regarding how each movement influenced the characteristics and trajectory of the other. The paper analyzes specific Romantic representations of slavery and their relevance to the abolition movement. The argument concludes…

Inversion of the Serpent and a Queer Reading of Coleridge

By: Vee Sharp ’24 English and Art Majors with Art History concentration and Creative Writing minor Brief Description: Animals hold a very specific weight as symbols, a weight that shifts and changes depending on what culture one looks at them from. Living in a culture very much influenced by Christian symbolism, we tend to associate…

Writers Together Essay: Sappho and Jahan Khatun

By: Emma Russell ’23 English and Theatre majors, Journalism Publishing and Editing minor Brief Description: This piece is about the similarities between the Greek poet Sappho and the Injuid poet Jahan Khatun’s work. Sappho is famous for being regarded as a lesbian due to how she writes her poetry. Jahan Khatun writes similarly to Sappho,…

Virginia Woolf’s Unrecognized Female Shakespeare: Margaret Cavendish

By: Megan Loock ’22 English major, Journalism Publishing and Editing minor Brief Description: This research paper is an extension of a presentation on philosopher and scientist Margaret Cavendish, her play Convent of Pleasure, and the play’s muti-disciplinary outreach. This paper dives deeper into the University College of Ripon and York St. John’s 1995 performance—the only…

Mitigating Risk While Maintaining Community: An Examination of the Effect of the Rise in Antisemitism on the American Reform Jewish Community

By: Kat DeSantis ’22, a Political Science and Philosophy major. The following was created for the Roy Ans Research Fellowship on the Study of Jewish Life and Thought at Washington College. Brief description: “Mitigating Risk While Maintaining Community: An Examination of the Effect of the Rise in Antisemitism on the American Reform Jewish Community” examines…

STEM in Politics

By: Iyonna Young ’22, a Business Management and Political Science major, and Spanish minor. The following work was created for POL 390: Political Science Internship. Brief description: Have you ever noticed that your congressperson may not actually have a thorough or complete idea about the science behind much of the legislation they present? STEM and its…

“You couldn’t be sure about anything”: Facades in William Trevor’s “Beyond the Pale” and “Death in Jerusalem”

By Annalie Buscarino ’21, an English and Sociology double major and Creative Writing; Psychology; and Justice, Law, and Society triple minor. The following work was created for ENG 334: Irish Short Story. Brief Description: Willian Trevor’s “Beyond the Pale” narrates the disruption of British imperialism through the ignored outburst of a woman against the indifference…

Comic Book Orange: Contrasting Visuality as Representative of the Self in Invisible Man

By Sophia Grabiec ’20, an English major and Secondary Education Studies minor. The following was created for ENG 345: The African American Novel. Brief description: This essay examines the artistic landscape of identity in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man by close reading the novel as a comic book with orange as the focus.   Riddled with contrast and contradictions, Ralph Ellison’s…

Theoretical Analysis: Marxist Exploitation Theory

By Emily Kreider ‘ 20, a Communication and Media Studies major with minors in English and Creative Writing. The following work was created for CMS 250: Intermediate Communication and Media Theory Brief Description: This piece examines the incompleteness of Karl Marx’s theory of exploitation, seeing as his writing does not take into consideration racial inequalities…

Recommendations for Risk Assessments of Intimate Partner Violence

By Saoirse ’20 Abstract Professionals within the criminal justice system will likely encounter victims and/or perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) within the course of their professional duties, given the prevalence of IPV. It is important that these professionals take a proactive and not a reactive approach to IPV and play an active role in…

Between the Lines: Race versus Gender in American Studies and Black Women’s Writing

By: Pauline Bewermeier ’19, an American Studies major. The following work was created for AMS 400: Race, Gender, and History of American Studies. Brief description: “Between the Lines: Race Versus Gender in American Studies and Black Women’s Writing” explores the interplay of race and gender throughout the politically charged and historically chauvinistic field of American…

Dismantling Performativity in The Country Wife and The Belle’s Stragatem

By: Erin Caine ’19, an English major. The following work was created for ENG 394: Restoration Comedy. Brief description: “Following the end of the Puritan regime in England in 1660, English theater experienced a renaissance, a restoration. This essay examines two Restoration Comedy plays and the ways in which female characters gain social knowledge and…