Mitigating Risk While Maintaining Community: An Examination of the Effect of the Rise in Antisemitism on the American Reform Jewish Community

By: Kat DeSantis ’22, a Political Science and Philosophy major. The following was created for the Roy Ans Research Fellowship on the Study of Jewish Life and Thought at Washington College. Brief description: “Mitigating Risk While Maintaining Community: An Examination of the Effect of the Rise in Antisemitism on the American Reform Jewish Community” examines…

STEM in Politics

By: Iyonna Young ’22, a Business Management and Political Science major, and Spanish minor. The following work was created for POL 390: Political Science Internship. Brief description: Have you ever noticed that your congressperson may not actually have a thorough or complete idea about the science behind much of the legislation they present? STEM and its…

“You couldn’t be sure about anything”: Facades in William Trevor’s “Beyond the Pale” and “Death in Jerusalem”

By Annalie Buscarino ’21, an English and Sociology double major and Creative Writing; Psychology; and Justice, Law, and Society triple minor. The following work was created for ENG 334: Irish Short Story. Brief Description: Willian Trevor’s “Beyond the Pale” narrates the disruption of British imperialism through the ignored outburst of a woman against the indifference…

Comic Book Orange: Contrasting Visuality as Representative of the Self in Invisible Man

By Sophia Grabiec ’20, an English major and Secondary Education Studies minor. The following was created for ENG 345: The African American Novel. Brief description: This essay examines the artistic landscape of identity in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man by close reading the novel as a comic book with orange as the focus.   Riddled with contrast and contradictions, Ralph Ellison’s…

Theoretical Analysis: Marxist Exploitation Theory

By Emily Kreider ‘ 20, a Communication and Media Studies major with minors in English and Creative Writing. The following work was created for CMS 250: Intermediate Communication and Media Theory Brief Description: This piece examines the incompleteness of Karl Marx’s theory of exploitation, seeing as his writing does not take into consideration racial inequalities…

Recommendations for Risk Assessments of Intimate Partner Violence

By Saoirse ’20 Abstract Professionals within the criminal justice system will likely encounter victims and/or perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) within the course of their professional duties, given the prevalence of IPV. It is important that these professionals take a proactive and not a reactive approach to IPV and play an active role in…

Between the Lines: Race versus Gender in American Studies and Black Women’s Writing

By: Pauline Bewermeier ’19, an American Studies major. The following work was created for AMS 400: Race, Gender, and History of American Studies. Brief description: “Between the Lines: Race Versus Gender in American Studies and Black Women’s Writing” explores the interplay of race and gender throughout the politically charged and historically chauvinistic field of American…

Dismantling Performativity in The Country Wife and The Belle’s Stragatem

By: Erin Caine ’19, an English major. The following work was created for ENG 394: Restoration Comedy. Brief description: “Following the end of the Puritan regime in England in 1660, English theater experienced a renaissance, a restoration. This essay examines two Restoration Comedy plays and the ways in which female characters gain social knowledge and…

The Impact of Conservatism, Union Membership, Age, Urbanization, and Education on Statewide Voter Turnout

By: Mai Do, a Political Science major. The following work was created for POL 401: Empirical Research Methods. There are myriad influences on voter turnout: education, party identification, income. As American society changes over time, this list only grows. Decades of surveying Americans has revealed some patterns in Americans’ voting behaviors, but societal, cultural, economic,…

Thoreau’s Dilling?

By: Julia Manaraze, a Humanities major. The following work was created for ENG 347: American Environmental Writing. Brief description: “In this essay, I sought to rectify the common misconception that Annie Dillard’s book Pilgrim at Tinker Creek is merely a “new-and-improved” Walden.  Though Dillard greatly admired Henry David Thoreau’s work and even wrote her senior…

From the Theoretical to the Practical: Tracing the Synthesis of Valentine de Saint-Point’s Artistic Theories in her Performance La Métachorie (1913)

By: Shannon Neal, an English major. The following work was created for ART 394: Women Artists. Brief description: “As is the case with most futurist women artists, little scholarship has been written on the multimedia performance art of Valentine de Saint-Point. When she is mentioned, the focus is on her two notable manifestos published in…

Coexistence of Creeds

By: Eman Simms ’19, an English and German Studies double major. The following work was created for ENG 336: Postcolonial Literature. Brief description: ” ‘Coexistence of Creeds’ examines the beneficial and adverse effects of Catholicism in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novel Purple Hibiscus. The essay argues that the outcome of following a religion depends on one’s…

The Ineffable Self and Memory in “Mrs. Dalloway”

By: Emily Holt. Literature has the ability to act as a vehicle through which the effects of consciousness can be explored. The limitations and influences of individual consciousness inherently prove to be obstructions in the pursuit of a true connection with another being; sharing thought and experience within the context of what it means to…

The Inspiration for Social Change

By: Eman Simms. Written as part of the course “Renaissance Drama” For centuries, theatre has been a centerpiece for expression. Whether used as a means of conveying religious ideology, moral character, novel ideas, or just pure entertainment, theatre has become an antique artform that has gained exceptional appreciation as well as numerous amounts of criticism….