The Monster of the Mind

By: Sarah Kelly ’22, a Business Management and Psychology double major. The following work was created for ENG 101: Literature and Composition Brief description: “Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s novel Frankensteinhas had a lasting influence on the horror genre. While Shelley’s Creature is physically characterized by a frightening and gruesome appearance, it is the horrors of reality embodied…

Waste, Water

By: James Looper, an Environmental Studies and Anthropology double major. The following work was created for ENG 201: The Art of Rhetoric. Brief description: “Waste, Water is a short documentary film that questions the culture surrounding life’s most valuable resource.” Introduction For our final project of producing a short documentary film, as well as a…

Between the Lines: Race versus Gender in American Studies and Black Women’s Writing

By: Pauline Bewermeier ’19, an American Studies major. The following work was created for AMS 400: Race, Gender, and History of American Studies. Brief description: “Between the Lines: Race Versus Gender in American Studies and Black Women’s Writing” explores the interplay of race and gender throughout the politically charged and historically chauvinistic field of American…

Dismantling Performativity in The Country Wife and The Belle’s Stragatem

By: Erin Caine ’19, an English major. The following work was created for ENG 394: Restoration Comedy. Brief description: “Following the end of the Puritan regime in England in 1660, English theater experienced a renaissance, a restoration. This essay examines two Restoration Comedy plays and the ways in which female characters gain social knowledge and…

The Impact of Conservatism, Union Membership, Age, Urbanization, and Education on Statewide Voter Turnout

By: Mai Do, a Political Science major. The following work was created for POL 401: Empirical Research Methods. There are myriad influences on voter turnout: education, party identification, income. As American society changes over time, this list only grows. Decades of surveying Americans has revealed some patterns in Americans’ voting behaviors, but societal, cultural, economic,…

Thoreau’s Dilling?

By: Julia Manaraze, a Humanities major. The following work was created for ENG 347: American Environmental Writing. Brief description: “In this essay, I sought to rectify the common misconception that Annie Dillard’s book Pilgrim at Tinker Creek is merely a “new-and-improved” Walden.  Though Dillard greatly admired Henry David Thoreau’s work and even wrote her senior…

From the Theoretical to the Practical: Tracing the Synthesis of Valentine de Saint-Point’s Artistic Theories in her Performance La Métachorie (1913)

By: Shannon Neal, an English major. The following work was created for ART 394: Women Artists. Brief description: “As is the case with most futurist women artists, little scholarship has been written on the multimedia performance art of Valentine de Saint-Point. When she is mentioned, the focus is on her two notable manifestos published in…

Coexistence of Creeds

By: Eman Simms ’19, an English and German Studies double major. The following work was created for ENG 336: Postcolonial Literature. Brief description: ” ‘Coexistence of Creeds’ examines the beneficial and adverse effects of Catholicism in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novel Purple Hibiscus. The essay argues that the outcome of following a religion depends on one’s…

Featured Artist: Picabo French ’19

Picabo French is a Biology and Studio Art double major. The following work was created for ART 492: Studio Art Senior Seminar. Artist statement: Amblyopia is a portrait. Amblyopia is a condition referred to commonly as a lazy eye, in which there is a misalignment in vision between the eyes that usually presents in childhood.Wound/…

Featured Artist: Dylan Grimes ’19

Dylan Grimes is a Studio Art and Biology double major. The following work was created for ART 394: Art and Language. Artist Statement: “A sound progression of the heart going through common emotions from resting to more vigorous emotions.” Dylan R. Grimes grew up in small town, Ridgely, MD. She is currently in her last…

Featured Artist: Ellie Lienert ’20

Ellie Lienert is Physics major. The following work was created for ENG 207: Intro to British Literature and Culture Artist statement: This piece is a visual interpretation of Aemelia Lanyer’s Eve’s Apology in Defense of Women that was inspired by Barbra Krueger’s pieces from the 1980s. Amelia Lanyer creates a compelling argument in her poem…

Featured Artist: Eman Simms ’19

Eman Simms is an English and German Studies double major. The following work was created for ENG 394: “The Rise of the Novel” and its Discontents. Artist statement: “This creative project consists of an illustration of protagonist Unca Winkfield from the anonymously written novel The Female American, and an accompanying gloss thereof. The illustration is…

Featured Artist: Casey Wolhar ’20

Casey Wolhar is a Studio Art and Communication and Media Studies double major. The following work was created for ART 394: Art and Language. Artist statement: “This audio piece was created by taking words about happiness and sadness and then overlapping them with my own personal phrases that have complicated meanings of both happy and…

Volume XXVI, Issue 1 Contributors

Pauline Bewermeier ’19 is a visiting exchange student and German teaching assistant from Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany. An American Studies major and Cultural Anthropology minor, she is fascinated by different cultures and learning new languages. Her year at Washington College has been invaluable regarding both her studies and the opportunity to share her own culture and…

Special Feature: Worst Sentence Contest

For the 2018 National Day on Writing we asked Washington College students to write down the worst sentences possible. This included found sentences, phrases from memory, and original content. Here are our top ten: “8:30am [classes] are fun and they add value to my life.” —Sophie Grabiec ’20 “Their our know rules.” —Katy Shenk ’21…

Faculty in Focus: Scientific Writing is Challenging and Can Inspire Change

Robin Van Meter, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science/Studies and Biology. Dr. Van Meter researches the effects of environmental pollution on amphibians and reptiles and teaches a range of courses including Applied Ecology, General Zoology, General Biology II, Conservation, and Wetlands Ecology. Her current scholarship investigates the effects of pesticides and fertilizers on juvenile leopard frogs….

The Effects of Capitalism on American Health

By: Maggie Witham. Written as part of the First-Year Seminar “The Raw, the Cooked, the Processed” The average American has been coerced into an extremely unhealthy diet by the dominating companies in the food industry. Bombarded with advertisements for fried, sugary, and processed foods, people tend to gravitate to these unnatural products and ignore the…

“Dark Humor” and the Facilitation of Hatred

By: Elizabeth Collins. Written as part of the First-Year Seminar “The Power of Language Ideologies” 1. Introduction Although social media outlets such as Reddit promote participatory media practices which provide grounds for productive, democratic discourse, these sites also have the potential to foster discourses of hatred against marginalized groups, especially given the anonymity these sites…