Moonlight and Dust: the Ethereal Sister-Brides of Dracula

Senior Capstone Experience by Leah Duff ’21 Submitted to the Department of English Advised by Dr. Katherine Charles Description:  From the beginning of modern horror as a genre, Bram Stoker’s Dracula has been an essential example of the inherent homoeroticism of monster fiction. It is widely accepted in Dracula scholarship that the sexual alignment and gender expression of the…

Evaluation of the Environmental Prevalence and Toxicity of Sulfonamides and Their Metabolites

Senior Capstone Experience by Allison Gallagher ’21 Submitted to the Department of Chemistry  Advised by Dr. Leslie Sherman Description: Antibiotics are one of the most used drugs worldwide. Sulfonamides (SNs) were the first class of antibiotics discovered, and remain among the top used antibiotics, as they are commonly used in humans, agriculture, and aquaculture. Due to the heavy use of…

Analysis of the Therapeutic Potential of Essential Oils as Antimicrobial Agents

Senior Capstone Experience by Jessica Gunoskey ’21 Submitted to the Department of Biology Advised by Dr. Kathleen Verville Description:  Essential oils (EOs) have been used as homeopathic remedies throughout history, primarily as inhalants or topical treatments. Essential oils are extracted from a variety of plants as volatile metabolites with high lipophilicity. Both in vivo and in vitro trials have shown…

The Body as an Abode of Freedom: Redefining the Female Self through Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus

Senior Capstone Experience by Nicole Hatfield ’21 Submitted to the Department of English Advised by Dr. Elizabeth O’Connor Description: Angela Carter describes Sophie Fevvers—the female protagonist of her eighth novel, Nights at the Circus (1984)—as a woman who breaks boundaries and redefines female empowerment: “What you have to do is to change the rules and make a new…

“True solace is finding none:” Grief Through the Seasons of Gretel Ehrlich’s The Solace of Open Spaces

Senior Capstone Experience by Rebecca Kanaskie ’21 Submitted to the Department of English Advised by Dr. Katherine Charles Description:  “A ‘place’ is made only by ‘slow accrual’ of births, lives, and death. A place comes about because stories and memories emerge from experience on that land” (MacDonald 501). In tandem with a research project funded by the Douglass Cater Society…

What Came Before and What Comes After XLNet

Senior Capstone Experience by Michelle Ly ’21 Submitted to the Department of Computer Science Advised by Dr. Kyle Wilson Description: This paper presents an overview of XLNet’s state-of-the-art system in the field of Natural Language Processing and specifically text generation. I look at previous language models Transformer-XL and BERT in order to understand the foundations that XLNet is built…

Friend of the Indian: The Origins and Purpose of Native American Education

Senior Capstone Experience by Alejandro Mendoza ’21 Submitted to the Department of History Advised by Dr. Carol E. Wilson Description: During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the United States embarked on a crusade to remove and disassociate American Indians from their land. As a result, many historians are quick to cite the brutal removal and slaughter of hundreds of…

The Effects of Mutated SOD1 on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and how siRNA Treatment Could Lead to a Cure

Senior Capstone Experience by Nathaniel Neuland ’21 Submitted to the Department of Chemistry Advised by Dr. James Lipchock Description: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is an incurable muscular dystrophy disease. The degradation of motor neurons and central nervous system leads to declining physical ability until the lungs are no longer…

The Fountain of Youth: Is Aging Reversible?

Senior Capstone Experience by Kylie Peets ’21 Submitted to the Department of Biology Advised by Dr. Mala Misra Description: Aging is a major risk factor for some of the most common chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, arthritis, and cancer, yet there is little emphasis on treating aging itself in the medical field. Many…

Direct Anthropogenic Actions and Their Negative Effects on Little Penguins (Eudyptula minor)

Senior Capstone Experience by William Reid ’21 Submitted to the Department of Environmental Science Advised by Dr. Jill Bible Description: Little penguins (Eudyptula minor) live exclusively on the Australian continent on the coasts of Australia and New Zealand. Humans have historically interacted with little penguins in negative ways, but the contemporary urbanization of society has greatly increased the harmfulness…

Visions of the Future for “Third Century America” at the 1976 Bicentennial Exposition on Science and Technology

Senior Capstone Experience by Katy Shenk ’21 Submitted to the Department of History Advised by Professor Janet Sorrentino Description: In 1976, the White House organized a science and technology exposition in conjunction with the Bicentennial celebration, or the 200th anniversary of the American Revolution. While the majority of Bicentennial programming focused on the past, this…

The Potential for European Green Crab (C. maenas) Invasion of the Chesapeake Bay

Senior Capstone Experience by Samina L. Soin-Voshell Submitted to the Departments of Biology and Environmental Science and Studies Advised by Dr. Jillian Bible and Dr. Martin Connaughton Description: The European green crab (Carcinus maenas) is a small shore crab native to the Northeastern Atlantic, but successful as an invasive species around the world, including along…

A Review of the Genetic, Epigenetic, and Toxicological Causes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Analysis of Current Treatments

Senior Capstone Experience by Maggie Witham ’21 Submitted to the Department of Biology Advised by Dr. Mindy Reynolds Description:  Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder of the reproductive endocrine system that affects 6-20% of pre-menopausal women worldwide. Disruptions in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG axis) and its upstream control counterparts are thought to lead to the development of PCOS. The…

Faculty in Focus: Writing Community

Dr. John Boyd, Director of the Writing Center In addition to teaching a First-Year Seminar, Writing Communities, Dr. Boyd teaches Writing Center Theory and Practice: A Seminar in Peer Tutoring, the course students take in preparation for working in the Writing Center. There, students learn pedagogical principles related to tutoring and develop a critical framework…

Dehumanization’s Presence in America and Humanitarianism

By: Julianna Sterling ’23, an International Studies and Economics major, French minor. The following work was created for FYS 101: Ethics of Humanitarianism. Brief description: This literature is a call to action for increased recognition of dehumanization’s role in societal trends in order to prevent its negative, long-term effects which manifest in the forms of…

Misogyny and the Bias of the Male Christian in Tennyson’s Idylls of the King

By: Joshua Torrence ’24, an English and Psychology major, and Creative Writing and Medieval/Early Modern Studies minor. The following work was created for FYS 101: King Arthur: From Myth to Modernity. Brief description: Tennyson’s Idylls of the King is a classic. However, it was also written throughout the Victorian era in Britain, where notions of…

Labor Economics and the Minimum Wage (Video)

By: Emily Hurley ’22, an Economics and Philosophy major and Asian Studies minor. The following work was created for ECN 219: Labor Economics Brief description: The economic reality of the minimum wage is often misunderstood by both sides of the political aisle. By discussing both theoretical and empirical frameworks for understanding the minimum wage, it…

Did Neanderthals Love? Evidence and Implications of Compassion in Neanderthal Healthcare Practices

By: Alaina Perdon, an Environmental Studies major, and Anthropology & Chesapeake Regional Studies minor. The following was created for ANT 107: Introduction to Environmental Archaeology. Brief Description: As modern humans, we view ourselves as completely removed from earlier iterations of people, failing to dignify them with deeper anthropogenic traits like emotions. This essay examines the…

The Social Epidemic of HIV

By: William Reid, an Environmental Science and Theatre major. The following work was created for ENV 294: Special Topics: Disease Ecology. Brief description: This piece details the HIV epidemic in the late 20th century and the various stigmas that the LGBTQ+ community faced during it, specifically gay and trans individuals. As a queer individual, I…